Station names in original tiling

sw15

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I've noticed that a few platforms on the Bakerloo, Jubilee, Northern and Piccadilly lines have the station name in the original tiling (e.g. Camden Town, Mornington Crescent). A few even display the original station name (e.g. Arsenal/Gillespie Road; Hampstead/Heath Street; Marylebone/Great Central; Warren Street/Euston Road). To save me cruising up and down these lines to search for more is there a complete list of station platforms with the name in the original tiling anywhere? Many thanks.
 
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sw15

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Swiss Cottage and St. John's Wood? He didn't say Yerkes style, to be fair.

Having said that, both of these are replica IIRC - albeit quite a good job done.
Certainly Swiss Cottage. I didn't notice one at St. John's Wood but I'll be more observant the next time I go through. Weren't these stations both on the Bakerloo line before the Jubilee line opened?
 

AlbertBeale

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Certainly Swiss Cottage. I didn't notice one at St. John's Wood but I'll be more observant the next time I go through. Weren't these stations both on the Bakerloo line before the Jubilee line opened?
Yes - all of the Jubilee north of Baker Street was one of the two branches of the Bakerloo. Which explains the relative positions of the deep tube platforms at Baker Street, and why the "same direction" platforms are adjacent in one direction but not the other: northbound split after the station (after all, only one could arrive at once), but there were two southbound platforms so they could arrive from both branches simultaneously. (Though they no doubt took it in turns to leave...)

The northbound Jubilee platform was the one that had to built (along with new links/junctions of course). The old tunnels still exist, linking the two lines there, though both lines have surface access to the outside world elsewhere, so presumably the old bits aren't used for moving stock between lines, but are still used for engineering trains.
 
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W-on-Sea

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Neither Swiss Cottage or St Johns Wood include mosaic tiling with the station name in: they were only opened in the late 1930s (or possibly early 1940s), and have the "biscuit" tiling of that period (also found at Bethnal Green, Wanstead-Redbridge-Gants Hill, Highgate, etc). One odd thing is that Hampstead station was never formally called "Heath Street".

Off the top of my head, I think the following have names in tiles, some original tiling ,some recent replicas, although it's possible I've missed some (and maybe included some that that no longer include names): essentially it's stations that were built under Yerkes (so excluding the City branch of the Northern Line) that escaped being redecorated between the 60s and 80s

Piccadilly line:
Arsenal, Holloway Road, Caledonian Road, Russell Square, Covent Garden (not sure about Hyde Park Corner, South Kensington, Gloucester Road, Earls Court)

Northern line:
Tufnell Park, Kentish Town, Hampstead, Belsize Park, Chalk Farm, Camden Town, Mornington Crescent, Euston Square

Bakerloo line:
Kilburn Park, Maida Vale, Warwick Avenue, Edgware Road, Marylebone, Regents Park (not sure about Lambeth North, Elephant & Castle)
 

bluegoblin7

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The old tunnels still exist, linking the two lines there, though both lines have surface access to the outside world elsewhere, so presumably the old bits aren't used for moving stock between lines, but are still used for engineering trains.
Whilst the Bakerloo is connected to National Rail at the north end, this cannot be used for transferring Bakerloo line stock or engineering trains. Even if it could, it would require a huge detour to get back onto the Tube network.

The link between the two lines is used regularly for engineering trains, test trains and 1972 stock transfers to and from Acton Works for life extension/overhaul works. This must be done during Engineering Hours due to incompatibilities with the Jubilee line signalling.
 

AlbertBeale

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Whilst the Bakerloo is connected to National Rail at the north end, this cannot be used for transferring Bakerloo line stock or engineering trains. Even if it could, it would require a huge detour to get back onto the Tube network.

The link between the two lines is used regularly for engineering trains, test trains and 1972 stock transfers to and from Acton Works for life extension/overhaul works. This must be done during Engineering Hours due to incompatibilities with the Jubilee line signalling.
Ah - thanks for this clarification. Presumably, the old Bakerloo branch (now Jubilee) can link with the rest of the underground network via the Met up Finchley Road way, and thus (via Circle/District, or via Picc at Rayners Lane) get to Acton Works.

By the way - apart from the lengthy diversion(!), why (in principle) couldn't the north end of the Bakerloo be used for stock movements, given the link to NR tracks at and from Queens Park? You implied it was impossible.
 

bluegoblin7

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Correct. Jubilee line connects to the Met at Neasden and Wembley Park, primarily for access to/from Neasden depot. Movements to and from the Jubilee will normally recess via Neasden depot for signalling system purposes.

It is physically possible to transfer stock to and from the Bakerloo via Queen’s Park, however as LUL stock is not registered to transit over the mainline outside of the dual running areas it would not happen. Even if you were going to haul them, nowhere on the Bakerloo is gauged for and set up for any mainline locomotives; this would be done via Ruislip depot.

Likewise, any movements to or from Ruislip (or any other LUL depot) would take significantly longer to go via NR.
 

Lewlew

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Didn't the 72 stock visit Scotland for overhaul at some point? How were they transferred there? Surely not by road...
 

Mojo

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Neither Swiss Cottage or St Johns Wood include mosaic tiling with the station name in: they were only opened in the late 1930s
I don’t think the OP actually specified Mosaic Tiles, just that the name was printed in tiles, which Swiss Cottage and St Johns Wood do have (along with Highgate et al for that matter).
 

trebor79

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Knightsbridge had the original tiling, compete with station name. Presumably still does underneath the grey labelling, no doubt damaged by the fixings for said panelling. I always thought what they did there was little short of vandalism.
 

Dstock7080

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Piccadilly line:
(not sure about Hyde Park Corner, South Kensington, Gloucester Road, Earls Court)
South Kensington and Earl’s Court we’re both re-tiled in the ‘90s-‘00 to remove the names.

Knightsbridge had the original tiling, compete with station name. Presumably still does underneath the grey labelling, no doubt damaged by the fixings for said panelling. I always thought what they did there was little short of vandalism.
Knightsbridge was modernised in the 1930s into the biscuit coloured tiles (as Highgate, Aldgate East etc.) and lost the large names then.
 
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Dent

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Neither Swiss Cottage or St Johns Wood include mosaic tiling with the station name in.
I don't believe that any station has the name in mosaic tiles, all the ones I have seen are glazed onto the tiles.

Knightsbridge was modernised in the 1930s into the biscuit coloured tiles (as Highgate, Aldgate East etc.) and lost the large names then.
Highgate was actually a new station in the 1930s, not a refurbishment. It never had the large Yerkes-style name as it was never a Yerkes station. It does, however, have the station name in tiles (possibly original, if not then identical copies)
 

bramling

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I don't believe that any station has the name in mosaic tiles, all the ones I have seen are glazed onto the tiles.

Highgate was actually a new station in the 1930s, not a refurbishment. It never had the large Yerkes-style name as it was never a Yerkes station. It does, however, have the station name in tiles (possibly original, if not then identical copies)
Highgate was fully retiled by Tube Lines. It’s along the lines of the original, but it’s certainly not identical. Swiss Cottage and SJW are much more faithful to the original.
 

Dent

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Highgate was fully retiled by Tube Lines. It’s along the lines of the original, but it’s certainly not identical. Swiss Cottage and SJW are much more faithful to the original.
What are the differences between the current and original tiles?
 

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