The work of a BR translator

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jnjkerbin

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Hi,

My Grandfather worked as a translator for British Rail during from the 1960s through to the late 80s / early 90s. At some point during that period he left Britsh Rail (possibly lost his job) but continued to work as a freelance translator and often worked for BR after this time. My mum says that he did work on the early Channel Tunnel efforts and translating documents/investigations about the early tilting trains.

Could anyone shed any light on what else he may have done? What sort of projects would a BR translator be involved in?

On a separate but related note, my Grandmother (his wife) gets a Widow's discount card which gives her something like 15 or so free days of travel per year and everything else gets a discount. Do TOCs still do issue these?

Thanks

Joe
 
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the sniper

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Do TOCs still do issue these?

If someone retires now and they worked for BR, yes. Generally those who have only worked for TOCs (i.e. joined post-BR) don't get anything in the way of travel privileges on retirement, though I believe some TOCs have arrangements for the retention of travel privileges on retirement.
 

ChiefPlanner

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BR had a shipping division link via Sealink - had several staffed agencies in Europe) jobs which were much coveted such as "Agent Berne" or "Agent Hamburg" - ran International services for freight via Dover. Partook in many working arrangements with the UIC in Paris and Berlin ,and as the continentals were much less English trained in those days (and the UIC worked in French) - there would have been plenty of translation of documents of all sorts.
 

jnjkerbin

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If someone retires now and they worked for BR, yes. Generally those who have only worked for TOCs (i.e. joined post-BR) don't get anything in the way of travel privileges on retirement, though I believe some TOCs have arrangements for the retention of travel privileges on retirement.

Thanks for that, I thought not.

BR had a shipping division link via Sealink - had several staffed agencies in Europe) jobs which were much coveted such as "Agent Berne" or "Agent Hamburg" - ran International services for freight via Dover. Partook in many working arrangements with the UIC in Paris and Berlin ,and as the continentals were much less English trained in those days (and the UIC worked in French) - there would have been plenty of translation of documents of all sorts.

Thank you for shedding a light on that!

Thanks
Joe:)
 

Crompton Karl

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Really does depend on where he worked and who for. British Rail International had offices all over the world, it kinda still exists after privatization, purchased by SNCF and renamed rail Europe. They still have staff there today who have to translate documents (predominantly French) into English for internal and external use. Do you know if he ever worked for BRI?

I worked for its successor for over 10 years until I left in may, previously also worked for Eurostar. One very good benefit of working there was it still retained the staff priv with 8 free boxes, valid across the whole of the former BR network. I was not safeguarded staff and any new employee still gets these boxes. I don't know of any other employer that was formerly part of BR that still issues boxes.

All the best

:)
 

34Short

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...And here's me thinking you were on about Translator coaches / wagons.

:oops:
 
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