This Signal?

Status
Not open for further replies.

The Snap

Established Member
Joined
10 Jun 2005
Messages
3,118
Hi guys,
Someone told me that thse sort of signals are used in sidings:




I just need to know a feww thinks about them:

1.) What the colours mean
2.) How they work
3.) Where they are used

I assume the arrow are used to tell the driver the way of the point...?

Thanks,
 
Sponsor Post - registered members do not see these adverts; click here to register, or click here to log in
R

RailUK Forums

Guinness

Established Member
Joined
13 Jun 2005
Messages
3,737
They're call Shunt Signals used in Sidings and on some parts of the mainline e.g. where a loco reverses into a Siding a convental signal isn't used. The arrows are for what line that signal is applicable for.

There is a link for it
http://www.signalbox.org/signals/semaphore4.htm
2nd Paragraph - Colour Signal on the right :)

2 Whites = Proceed
 

Nitro

Member
Joined
20 Nov 2005
Messages
475
Location
London
These are shunt signals, the top one means you can not enter the siding and you have to follow the normal singal, the bottom one is the same but on newer fittings. Hope this helps :P
 

The Snap

Established Member
Joined
10 Jun 2005
Messages
3,118
Chaz said:
They're call Shunt Signals used in Sidings and on some parts of the mainline e.g. where a loco reverses into a Siding a convental signal isn't used. The arrows are for what line that signal is applicable for.

There is a link for it
http://www.signalbox.org/signals/semaphore4.htm
2nd Paragraph - Colour Signal on the right :)

2 Whites = Proceed

Cheers, Chaz, so:

2 White = Clear
1 White 1 Red = ??
2 Red = ??
1 White 1 Yellow = ??

Cheers,
 

The Snap

Established Member
Joined
10 Jun 2005
Messages
3,118
Seth said:
Rich said:
1 White 1 Red = Stop
2 Red = Stop (modern LED version)
1 White 1 Yellow = There is no yellow aspect

Right, cheers Seth. So, 2 white is clear, 2 red is stop (LED version), and 1 white 1 red is stop too.

I'll use the 2 red, and 2 white ones I think... :D
 

Tomnick

Established Member
Joined
10 Jun 2005
Messages
5,446
Yellow and white (or two yellows) arranged horizontally, mean that the signal may be passed only if the following points are set for the headshunt (or other specified route). If the route is set towards the main line, then the signal cannot be passed unless it is displaying two (diagonal) white lights. These 'yellow shunts' allow shunting moves to take place, in theory, in and out of a headshunt repeatedly, without the involvement of a signalman. They're very rare now though, with two normal GPLs (i.e. position light signal, as above) being provided in modern schemes - one for moves towards the headhunt, and another in the opposite direction. Usually both can be left 'off' to allow the shunter to do exactly as he wishes :) .

Two whites, by the way, means 'proceed with caution as far as the line is clear' - doesn't mean there's not a train before the next signal! The arrow on the signal identification plate just shows which line the signal refers to, if it's situated on the ground between two lines.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Top