Why are people opposed to HS2? (And other HS2 discussion)

Discussion in 'UK Railway Discussion' started by ABB125, 24 Jan 2019.

  1. EastisECML

    EastisECML Member

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    That line twists and turns through County Durham and then make a couple of even sharper looking turns before they approach Durham city. Then after Durham there is another particularly wheel scraping corner before Chester-le-Street. It's not exactly crawling speed, but it's not overly fast either. What makes it worse is the A1(M) motorway passes along the same corridor on a much straighter alignment. It's a pity when that motorway was being built the opportunity wasn't taken to realign the ECML alongside it. Although accessing Durham will always require that dog leg route after Ferryhill.
     
  2. Railwaysceptic

    Railwaysceptic Member

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    The area around Durham is only part of the story. Between Newcastle and Berwick the ECML is a mediocre railway while between Berwick and Edinburgh it's downright bad!
     
  3. EastisECML

    EastisECML Member

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    A Morpeth bypass and a new section replacing the line north of Berwick that overlooks the sea might be worth while.
     
  4. yoyothehobo

    yoyothehobo Member

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    Yes, but it would be very tricky. The topography is unfriendly and so is the geology if you were to tunnel, so it would have to be a long, fairly deep tunnel which may scupper any benefits.
     
  5. sprunt

    sprunt Member

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    Getting rid of that stretch of line that goes past the sea might get me off the train onto the plane when I travel from London to Edinburgh.
     
  6. Railwaysceptic

    Railwaysceptic Member

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    Yes. One of the ironies of the ECML is that the really good parts run through flat, agricultural land while the bad parts run through picturesque terrain!
     
    Last edited: 5 Jul 2019
  7. EastisECML

    EastisECML Member

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    Following the A1 around Morpeth might be the simplest way and combine it with dualling the A1.
     
  8. yoyothehobo

    yoyothehobo Member

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    Sorry, I was referring to the bit north of Berwick.
     
  9. class26

    class26 Member

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    But there are places around Berwick where the line is perilously close to the cliff edge. At some point the line is going into the north sea and it might be a good time soon to take a look at whole stretch to move it inland and straighten it out somewhat
     
  10. EastisECML

    EastisECML Member

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    I think they'll eventually end up bypassing the existing Berwick station to avoid that exposed sea section and have a station in Tweedmouth before crossing the Tweed near the wonderfully named 'Well Hung and Tender' butchers. Ideally though a new section of track heading inland from Ramparts Business Park would be the plan.
     
  11. yoyothehobo

    yoyothehobo Member

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    If you want to avoid any sea related issues, you will have to avoid Berwick and the easiest route appears to be going from Cheswick in a nearly straight line to Reston and then take your medicine past Penmanshiel. there is no advantage going any further west.
     
  12. Facing Back

    Facing Back Member

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    I love the name of that butchers...
     
  13. Bald Rick

    Bald Rick Established Member

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    Sorry, I’ve not been watching this thread for a while, but I couldn’t let the following go unchallenged:

    The cost of doing all this would easily be more than HS2. For a start, to get to 160mph, you would have to replace all the track, signalling and OLE, close all level crossings, close any platforms on the fast lines and rebuild on new lines, straighten out significant stretches of alignment, and no doubt strengthen or replace most of the structures (over and under the line). You would also need to widen the formation, as the track centres need to be 4200mm apart at 160mph, compared to 3800mm at 125mph. That 400mm would be very expensive to win. Effectively you would be building a completely new railway around the existing one.

    Then you would spend another load of cash sorting the ‘bottlenecks’. Which has been explained in numerous threads previously, actually gives very little in terms of capacity given the mix of services and central London station capacity.

    And you need to do all this whilst trying to run trains.
     
  14. Facing Back

    Facing Back Member

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    Would it all be easier and cheaper to move the capital to somewhere like Lincolnshire? It seems to be that London is quite hard. Its almost as if the Romans didn't plan properly for today.

    We could build lovely new straight fast train lines good for many hundreds of miles per hour, perhaps an experimental hyperloop from the capital to the new massive 6 runway airport we would be able to build.

    We could easily fund it all by not having to refurbish the houses of commons and selling them to be converted into a hotel.

    I believe that housing and land are both cheaper too so Megastation One lurking at the heart of this won't be too expensive to build.
     
  15. EastisECML

    EastisECML Member

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    Just out of interest, would that be enough space for continental gauge trains?

    I like this, chuck in the Umbrella Corps' Bee Hive deadly chemical weapons research and development facility underneath to fund it. Never mind sky rights, 'cave rights' will pay all of this.
     
  16. Bald Rick

    Bald Rick Established Member

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    Yep, width ways.
     
  17. DynamicSpirit

    DynamicSpirit Established Member

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    What are you going to tell all the people who work for the Government, or for companies that want to be located near the Government, in London? Sorry guys, you've gotta uproot your families and move to this brand new town that we're building. And by the way, how much do you think the cost of building a new capital with all the associated infrastructure will be? And how many objections from the people already living in Lincolnshire to the destruction of an area of countryside would you expect?

    Many hundreds of miles an hour? Can you name anywhere in the World that has trains capable of 'many hundreds of miles an hour'? Are you aware of any technology that has been developed to allow this? And do you actually know anything about the hyperloop and all the reasons why it almost certainly will never be able to carry people?

    And have you thought about the cost of building these hypothetical futuristic fast train lines from across the country to Lincolnshire? (Clue: It'll be many, many times greater than the cost of building HS2).

    Also, unless most of the business that are located in London also choose to move to the new capital, the only people you'll lose are the ones who work for the Government and associated industries - which is a pretty small proportion of the people living in London. Most of those businesses are pretty unlikely to want to move, as most of them have no need to be in the *capital* - you'll find most of them are in London because that's the place where the expertise and professional staff they need can most easily get to (or already live). So even if you do move the capital to Lincolnshire, you'll probably still need to build HS2 to accommodate the demand for people to get to London.

    No you won't be able to. Not refurbishing the houses of commons will save you between £3bn and £5bn. That sounds a lot, but at a rough guess, I'd say it's probably something like 1% of the total cost of what you're proposing. Maybe less. Besides, the houses of Parliament are actually in a *dangerous* state. How on Earth will you convert it to a hotel if you don't refurbish the buildings and make them safe first?

    Well yes, land is cheaper in Lincolnsire. You got that bit right. Doesn't mean a whole new city etc. won't still be mega-expensive to build.
     
  18. Facing Back

    Facing Back Member

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    I'm sorry, you may have invested my idea with more seriousness than I had intended. I think Bald Rick may have picked up that I wasn't entirely (read that as "in any way") serious
     
  19. Bald Rick

    Bald Rick Established Member

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    Having relocated myself to Lincolnshire in the past (and fairly rapidly relocated myself back out) I knew straight away that no-one could ever seriously propose relocating the capital city there!
     
  20. Facing Back

    Facing Back Member

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    I'm going to a wedding there at the weekend - I suspect that's why Lincolnshire popped into my mind....
     
  21. si404

    si404 Member

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    I know your post would have been sponsored by Crayola had you been genuinely serious, but mentioning the HYPErloop with its low capacity overly-fast Concorde-esque approach (only with less comfort than even the Spartan Concorde) to railways as a good idea in the UK just crosses the line from speculative spitballing into super crazy crayons! <D
     
  22. Facing Back

    Facing Back Member

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    Actually that's a good point - there will be room for long runways so the airport can be a spaceport as well! Once we've perfected hyperloop vacuum and propulsion technology we can use the same on a large scale to accelerate the spaceplanes to very high velocity before launch.

    We'd need some kind of field technology to allow the place to exit the tunnel whilst maintaining the vacuum but how hard can that be?

    My guess is that we can nail this technology in about the same timeframe as persuading the government and the civil service to relocate.

    ps I liked Concorde. Things don't always have to make sense....
     
  23. DynamicSpirit

    DynamicSpirit Established Member

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    Haha! Oooops!

    My excuse is that there are so many people around who probably could've written what you wrote, and meant it completely seriously ;)
     
  24. Facing Back

    Facing Back Member

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    Me bad - sorry :D
     
  25. EastisECML

    EastisECML Member

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    It's a pity that is so disruptive and expensive as the ability to run double decker trains into our cities (I'm obviously adding overhead clearances to this) would be a big step up (literal and figuratively). But as said, building new makes more sense than laying waste to everything while it's still being used.
     
  26. sprunt

    sprunt Member

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    Well, there's no shortage of fields in Lincolnshire so there must be plenty of experts to help you come up with the technology...
     
  27. yoyothehobo

    yoyothehobo Member

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    And those experts are outstanding in their fields, well the scarecrows are.
     
  28. al78

    al78 Established Member

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    I thought it was more that for an international company, having a London address for their head office gives prestige.

    It terms of ease of accessibility, Birmingham would arguably be better location for a capital city than London. It is very central, and can be easily accessed from all directions, there would be less housing pressure on any one nearby county because there are so many places to live that are within an hours commute.
     
  29. Facing Back

    Facing Back Member

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    True for some to be sure. I know an international company who has recently moved its head office to London. They have 30,000 staff of which 18 are based in the head office. They have some nice conference rooms as well of course.
     
  30. The Ham

    The Ham Established Member

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    A recent piece on HS2:
    https://www.thecourier.co.uk/fp/opi...hen-britains-rail-system-fails-on-the-basics/

    There's a lot to go through, however the main thing that struck me was that the biggest complaint was a UK based train was delayed (I'd suggest that there's a good chance that if you did it that the UK train could be on time and several of the others could be delayed) not the fact that on one train the heating is a coal fired brazier.

    Also they cite that the reason for HS2 is because the 8:10 or of Paddington isn't quick enough, errrr.... Paddington?!? Why would you be using HS2 if you were departing from Paddington?

    If this is the quality that those opposed to HS2 can produce then it looks like that it's fairly safe from any serious review.
     

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