Is the phrase "whiter than white" racist?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Geezertronic, 16 Sep 2018.

  1. deltic

    deltic Established Member

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    Out of interest what heritage are you proud off?
     
  2. Paul Sidorczuk

    Paul Sidorczuk Veteran Member

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    Giving my age away, when I played cricket for St Bede's College, Manchester in the late 1950s/early 1960s, our sports master always insisted that our cricket whites were impeccably clean so as to give a good impression.
     
  3. Paul Sidorczuk

    Paul Sidorczuk Veteran Member

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    In 1969, the group Blue Mink sang a song called "Melting Pot", the start of the lyrics being as below:-

    Take a pinch of white man
    Wrap it up in black skin
    Add a touch of blue blood
    And a little bitty bit of Red Indian boy

    Curly Latin kinkies
    Mix with yellow Chinkees
    If you lump it all together
    Well, you got a recipe for a get-along scene
    Oh, what a beautiful dream
    It could only come true, you know, you know

    What we need is a great big melting pot
    Big enough to take the world and all it's got
    And keep it stirring for a hundred years or more
    And turn out coffee coloured people by the score

     
  4. furnessvale

    furnessvale Established Member

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    A song which IMO, manages to offend just about every variation in the human race.

    I am proud of my heritage. I expect every other variation are proud of their's and have no desire to be "coffee coloured".
     
  5. swj99

    swj99 Member

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    If someone's being deliberately offensive, that's one thing, but in many cases now, I suspect people are just looking for something to be offended about. Almost like the old game of, "Did you spill my pint ?"
    I don't seem to be able to get offended at the things a lot of people say they do. I've been labelled and called names, but to be honest, even that doesn't actually 'hurt'.

    Words and phrases are not in themselves racist. To me, it's the intent behind it, and I think most people know when something's not right, or when somebody is being intentionally offensive.
     
  6. Belperpete

    Belperpete Member

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    Does that mean that it is acceptable to keep say things that others find deeply offensive just because you yourself don't think it offensive? Most racist would jump at this excuse.

    In my view, you can be excused the first time if you didn't realise it might be offensive, but to repeat it after that is being deliberately offensive. Even in private, because repeating it is to encourage other people to say it.
     
  7. swj99

    swj99 Member

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    In my view, everyone is responsible for their own issues and reactions. I decide how to respond to what is said to me and nobody can take over my emotions and make me 'feel' anything. I was once called a F****** pikey, and even though I'm 100% sure it was meant as an insult, I found it funny, and didn't feel offended at all.

    As I've said before, if people carry on being scared to say things in case someone else decides to feel offended, then followed to it's logical conclusion, people won't be able to say anything, because any remark has the potential to be mistaken as offensive, and we'd eventually have to ban most of the words in the dictionary, just in case.

    It's all about the context. Did you watch The Young Ones ? There's an episode (I think it's the one called 'Boring') in which there's a dream sequence involving Rik, who has a fantasy that he's the 'people's poet'. Two comedy policemen approach a group of young men on a pavement with a cartoon background, and one of the officers says, "You gay black b******..." to them. There is no suggestion they are gay, and none of them are black. I understand the intention of that scripting, in the context of the show, was to draw attention to blind stupidity of actual racism and homophobia, not to insult homosexuals, black people or those who are illigitimate. It was quite groundbreaking stuff considering when it was first on the tv. That episode is on youtube, but it looks like you have to pay £1.99 to watch it, unless you've got it on VHS somewhere.
     
  8. Strat-tastic

    Strat-tastic Member

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    PC comes to the fore in society and more people end up being offended. Ergo, PC is madness, as I've maintained all along.
    What we need is good manners seasoned with a gracious attitude.

    There. That's the world put to rights on a Friday :p
     
  9. Harbornite

    Harbornite Established Member

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    I’m not one to use phrases like “pc gone mad” but it seems fitting here. It’s not racist.
     
  10. Teflon Lettuce

    Teflon Lettuce Established Member

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    at the end of the day whatever happened to "sticks and stones may break my bones; but names will never hurt me"?
     
  11. Josie

    Josie Member

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    It was just plain wrong, really.
     
  12. Teflon Lettuce

    Teflon Lettuce Established Member

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    why was it wrong?... a name can only hurt you if you allow it to
     
  13. matacaster

    matacaster Member

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    No its not, from memory it was about a washing powder and a white shirt. Possibly Daz, Omo, Surf, Persil???
     

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