Possible photo ban on Glasgow Subway

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Ivo

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The new rules add: ‘The only exception to byelaw 12.1 is if a passenger has the written permission of SPT in relation to the activity.

‘The passenger must be carrying the permission, show it to an officer on request, and comply with any conditions of that permission.'
Surely that's no different to Newcastle (well, apart from being a full Byelaw and not just a rule)? It's still possible isn't it?
 

jon0844

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Good luck getting BTP to take action against kids taking photos of themselves on a platform or on a train.

BTP will not be in the slightest bit interested and will be thinking this is just something that is going to cause them loads of problems. I wonder if they were consulted?
 

PaxVobiscum

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And good luck to the SPT with Bylelaw 10.1 as well:

10 Intoxication

10.1 Passengers must not enter or remain on any part of the subway if they are drunk or unfit to be on the subway because they are under the influence of alchohol or any other intoxicating substance.
Nae chance bye the way.
 
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Schnellzug

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"‘Our company policy has always been that consent must be sought prior to any photography taking place, and this is in line with security restrictions at any major transport hub, including railway stations, airports etc."

Excuse me? That's really stretching the truth a bit, isn't it. And I like their arrogance in assuming that they are a Major transport Hub.
 

Mutant Lemming

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Flash photography is not allowed on most networks but with the advent of cameras in mobile phones and small cameras I don't see how a ban could be enforceable. How do you distinguish someone making a phone call from someone surreptitiously taking photgraphs?
 

Clip

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Flash photography is not allowed on most networks but with the advent of cameras in mobile phones and small cameras I don't see how a ban could be enforceable. How do you distinguish someone making a phone call from someone surreptitiously taking photgraphs?

Its been years since Ive been on the Glasgow underground so im unsure about this but how would they get a signal to make a call?
 

MK Tom

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I'd hardly call the Glasgow Underground a network! Banning flash makes complete sense as it dazzles drivers, but banning photography is a pointless thing to do with no positive consequences - all it achieves is attacking enthusiasts. It doesn't keep anyone safe or prevent terrorism or anything like that.
 

MidnightFlyer

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Its been years since Ive been on the Glasgow underground so im unsure about this but how would they get a signal to make a call?
I think most stations are quite deep underground, but at Partick you only have to travel down two short escalators; one of which isn't strictly underground, to reach the platforms from ground level. I recall getting a signal down there in the past.
 

Clip

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I think most stations are quite deep underground, but at Partick you only have to travel down two short escalators; one of which isn't strictly underground, to reach the platforms from ground level. I recall getting a signal down there in the past.
Thats what I thought. So bar one station im guessing its going to be pretty easy to determine who is taking a photo with their phone :lol:
 

PaxVobiscum

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Thats what I thought. So bar one station im guessing its going to be pretty easy to determine who is taking a photo with their phone :lol:
I am reliably informed that some people, even in Glasgow, possess a mobile device which has functions in addition to those of a phone and a camera.

:D
 

Snapper

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all it achieves is attacking enthusiasts. [/QUOTE]

It attacks anyone with a camera, not just enthusiasts. Sometimes we need to remember that it's not all about us.
 

455driver

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Its probably because they are sick and tired of people using flash all the time, there was some thick tart with an SLR on Waterloo using flash last week, she was none to pleased when I went round and gave her a piece of my mind, the last thing I wanted was 2 flashes straight at me when I was 15 feet from the buffers, she started with the "I know my rights" malarky to which I replied "well I know the railway bylaws" at which point the station supervisor took her "for a little chat" about rights and wrongs.
If you dont know Waterloo we need to be no more than about 6 feet from the buffers to ensure the rear of the train is in clear so cant afford to get it wrong.
 

jon0844

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I can get the anger against people using a flash, but what's the betting the enforcement of the law will be somewhat selective?

Man with SLR - stopped.
Girl with cameraphone - allowed.
 

SS4

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I can get the anger against people using a flash, but what's the betting the enforcement of the law will be somewhat selective?

Man with SLR - stopped.
Girl with cameraphone - allowed.
The former you can reasonably assume is taking pictures, the latter you cannot. You'd have to catch the latter red-handed.
 

jon0844

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Well, I was implying the person with a cameraphone would be seen using it. Not just suspected of carrying one (or else mobiles will be banned or made to have tamper proof stickers put over the image sensors, as used in some factories and labs etc).
 

bAzTNM

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I don't get why they have quoted, in the original article, the guy who was taking photos in Braehead. You'd think he'd want to keep his head down after all the rumours as to what he was *actually* doing with his camera that day. Heard the 100% legit story from a lawyer friend of mine. Supposedly not a nice individual.

ADDED: I'll add that what I heard wasn't about anything to do with any children.
 
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NY Yankee

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Its sort of like when MTA tried to enforce a ban on the New York Subway in 2004 and 2006.
Whenever I try to take pictures of buses in NYC, I get looked at like I'm a terrorist.

Its probably because they are sick and tired of people using flash all the time, there was some thick tart with an SLR on Waterloo using flash last week, she was none to pleased when I went round and gave her a piece of my mind, the last thing I wanted was 2 flashes straight at me when I was 15 feet from the buffers, she started with the "I know my rights" malarky to which I replied "well I know the railway bylaws" at which point the station supervisor took her "for a little chat" about rights and wrongs.
If you dont know Waterloo we need to be no more than about 6 feet from the buffers to ensure the rear of the train is in clear so cant afford to get it wrong.
I can sympathise with train drivers. Flash can distract them and even cause an accident. Maybe they should ban flash, but not photography in general.
 

455driver

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Flash is banned but people still use it, if they cant abide by the rules then the next thing is to ban photography all together. Its the photters own fault because they dont stick to the current rules and the new "no photography" rule will be easier to police.
 

jon0844

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Surely an outright ban doesn't solve the problem, and is therefore not a good solution.

Someone ignores the no flash rule - so what makes them stop taking a photo (with or without a flash) when there's an outright ban?

If the current rule is being ignored, what makes the even tighter one get respected? How is it easier to police? In fact, it's got to be quite hard to spot people taking photos (especially with cameraphones) and a waste of resources. You can probably see a camera flash, as that's somewhat harder to hide.

Also - will there be powers to demand a photo or video is deleted? Or just a 'Oi, no photos' which may often be too late at that stage anyway!
 

455driver

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It will be easier to police because spotters usually go to the ends of the platforms and so are easy to keep an eye on, I would much prefer it if people would just be sensible, respect the rules and then there wouldnt be any need for tighter rules.

Most people "KNOW MY RIGHTS" but forget that with those rights comes responsibility!

Okay in the scheme of things a flash going off doesnt appear to be a big deal, but as I had a few weeks ago at Waterloo, that bint could have distracted me enough for the train to hit the buffers. Can you imagine the **** that would hit the fan then, I would be taken off driving for a week or so, the train/ platform taken out out of service for an investigation/ repairs causing other services to be delayed/ cancelled etc, just because some selfish bint doesnt know/ understand or comply with the rules.

I enjoy taking pictures of trains as much as the next enthusiast but the few will wreck it for the majority.
 

NSEFAN

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jonmorris0844 said:
Also - will there be powers to demand a photo or video is deleted? Or just a 'Oi, no photos' which may often be too late at that stage anyway!
I don't think a member of staff would be able to legally order the destruction of photos, but they probably have the power to kick you of the railway's property if they see fit.

455driver said:
I enjoy taking pictures of trains as much as the next enthusiast but the few will wreck it for the majority.
Exactly. Common sense needs to come from both parties.
 

jon0844

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Go after those using a flash, don't ban all photography everywhere. Especially if it won't stop the idiots, who need to be targeted more directly.

Here's a crazy idea. At the ends of the platforms, away from where most people stand, why not put up signs to say no flash photography (and maybe about the use of tripods in dangerous positions). That would make enforcement easier with no room for doubt on the part of the photographer.
 
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