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All the trimmings?

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Strat-tastic

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When a restaurant advertises 'Christmas dinner with all the trimmings' how can I know whether I am, indeed, being served all the trimmings?

Where are these defined? If I don't get, say, bread sauce, am I legally entitled to refuse to pay for part of the meal? To where may I refer in order to self-manage my expectations?

Ho ho ho! ;)
 
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pdeaves

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When a restaurant advertises 'Christmas dinner with all the trimmings' how can I know whether I am, indeed, being served all the trimmings?

Where are these defined? If I don't get, say, bread sauce, am I legally entitled to refuse to pay for part of the meal? To where may I refer in order to self-manage my expectations?

Ho ho ho! ;)
"all of the trimmings that we have available, at no extra cost to you" (as opposed to "bread sauce? that'll be an extra £2.50 please")
 

najaB

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When a restaurant advertises 'Christmas dinner with all the trimmings' how can I know whether I am, indeed, being served all the trimmings?
Count the number of trimmings - if the total is anything less than 'all' then you have a reason to complain.
 

Cowley

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Count the number of trimmings - if the total is anything less than 'all' then you have a reason to complain.
Indeed. I’d be expecting a full medieval Christmas banquet with a swan stuffed with a turkey stuffed with a chicken stuffed with a pheasant etc.
Anything less than that and I’d expect some beheadings after the cheese board.
 

61653 HTAFC

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Indeed. I’d be expecting a full medieval Christmas banquet with a swan stuffed with a turkey stuffed with a chicken stuffed with a pheasant etc.
Anything less than that and I’d expect some beheadings after the cheese board.
Purely from an efficiency point of view, I'd suggest doing the beheadings with the cheeseboard...
 

yorksrob

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So long as they don't fob you off with crappy new potatoes. We had this abomination at our works xmas do.
 

Mag_seven

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So long as they don't fob you off with crappy new potatoes. We had this abomination at our works xmas do.

Sacrilege - should be roast potatoes. I always make sure I'm the first to get straight into the dish with the roasties on them and ensure I get more than my fair share. Someone else can have the dish with the sprouts/greens! :D
 

nlogax

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New potatoes instead of roasties in a Christmas dinner are an abomination. Someone should start a petition or something.
 

yorksrob

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Sacrilege - should be roast potatoes. I always make sure I'm the first to get straight into the dish with the roasties on them and ensure I get more than my fair share. Someone else can have the dish with the sprouts/greens! :D

Yes indeed (although I love the sprouts and the greens as well - except parsnips. They're like eating perfume :()
 

Cowley

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I love sprouts too. Go on then, I’ll say it again...
I LOVE SPROUTS!!

I’d fill the bath up with them and roll around in it if I was allowed (unfortunately I’m not).
 

Ken H

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Yes indeed (although I love the sprouts and the greens as well - except parsnips. They're like eating perfume :()

Parsnips are lovey. cant beat parsnips roasted on goose fat.

And sprouts.

just no broccoli.
 

yorksrob

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Parsnips are lovey. cant beat parsnips roasted on goose fat.

And sprouts.

just no broccoli.

Ooh, I love broccolli, and cauliflour, and all the heavenly brassicas. Just none of that parsnip filth !
 

Bevan Price

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When a restaurant advertises 'Christmas dinner with all the trimmings' how can I know whether I am, indeed, being served all the trimmings?

Where are these defined? If I don't get, say, bread sauce, am I legally entitled to refuse to pay for part of the meal? To where may I refer in order to self-manage my expectations?

Ho ho ho! ;)
Trimmings might alternatively mean a few "christmassy decorations" in the room. Not sure you would want to eat any of the holly.......(if present).
 

Busaholic

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I know it's slightly off topic. but are we talking about an actual Christmas dinner in a restaurant i.e., in my terms, on Christmas Day itself and, if I was feeling really picky, in the evening, although I'll allow that some appear to think dinner can be eaten at LUNCHtime? I've often genuinely wondered why anyone, no matter how lonely or untalented at cooking, would want to eat out on Christmas Day, assuming that is that you're not away from home.

In my experience so many restaurants are mediocre and over-priced, and at Christmas/New Year/Valentine's become mediocre and vastly over-priced, presumably. The best restaurants seem to remain stubbornly closed on Christmas Day!

So then, we come to the question of restaurant Christmas dinners served in the pre- Christmas period. If turkey is kept for a special occasion like Christmas, then why choose to eat it (or a version of it) a fortnight before the big occasion too? I'm genuinely puzzled.
 

Bletchleyite

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I eat turkey (usually turkey steak) all the time, though mostly I can't be bothered preparing "all the trimmings". It's as versatile a meat as chicken but actually tastes of something and has texture. Though I did just have the other half of the bag of sprouts mentioned upthread! :)
 

Strat-tastic

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I know it's slightly off topic. but are we talking about an actual Christmas dinner in a restaurant i.e., in my terms, on Christmas Day itself and, if I was feeling really picky, in the evening, although I'll allow that some appear to think dinner can be eaten at LUNCHtime? I've often genuinely wondered why anyone, no matter how lonely or untalented at cooking, would want to eat out on Christmas Day, assuming that is that you're not away from home.

In my experience so many restaurants are mediocre and over-priced, and at Christmas/New Year/Valentine's become mediocre and vastly over-priced, presumably. The best restaurants seem to remain stubbornly closed on Christmas Day!

So then, we come to the question of restaurant Christmas dinners served in the pre- Christmas period. If turkey is kept for a special occasion like Christmas, then why choose to eat it (or a version of it) a fortnight before the big occasion too? I'm genuinely puzzled.

I'm exploring the phrase (to the nth degree of pedantry if you like), but feel free to discuss anything about this wonderful meal :)
 

Greenback

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We went to a local cafe yesterday. They don't advertise 'all the trimmings', but they do list what you're going to get. The trimmings we had were cranberry sauce, and 5 pigs in blankets, along with 9 sprouts and what seemed to be a serving dish of carrots. Then there were 5 roasties and a big pile of mash.

This was a regular size Christmas dinner according to the menu. I couldn't finish it, though I did eat all the sprouts. I dread to think what their large dinner would be like!
 

yorksrob

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I know it's slightly off topic. but are we talking about an actual Christmas dinner in a restaurant i.e., in my terms, on Christmas Day itself and, if I was feeling really picky, in the evening, although I'll allow that some appear to think dinner can be eaten at LUNCHtime? I've often genuinely wondered why anyone, no matter how lonely or untalented at cooking, would want to eat out on Christmas Day, assuming that is that you're not away from home.

In my experience so many restaurants are mediocre and over-priced, and at Christmas/New Year/Valentine's become mediocre and vastly over-priced, presumably. The best restaurants seem to remain stubbornly closed on Christmas Day!

So then, we come to the question of restaurant Christmas dinners served in the pre- Christmas period. If turkey is kept for a special occasion like Christmas, then why choose to eat it (or a version of it) a fortnight before the big occasion too? I'm genuinely puzzled.

Because I like turkey. I could have xmas dinner every week.
 

yorksrob

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We went to a local cafe yesterday. They don't advertise 'all the trimmings', but they do list what you're going to get. The trimmings we had were cranberry sauce, and 5 pigs in blankets, along with 9 sprouts and what seemed to be a serving dish of carrots. Then there were 5 roasties and a big pile of mash.

This was a regular size Christmas dinner according to the menu. I couldn't finish it, though I did eat all the sprouts. I dread to think what their large dinner would be like!

That sounds good - although five pigs in blankets is probably excessive, even for me !
 

Ken H

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I know it's slightly off topic. but are we talking about an actual Christmas dinner in a restaurant i.e., in my terms, on Christmas Day itself and, if I was feeling really picky, in the evening, although I'll allow that some appear to think dinner can be eaten at LUNCHtime? I've often genuinely wondered why anyone, no matter how lonely or untalented at cooking, would want to eat out on Christmas Day, assuming that is that you're not away from home.

In my experience so many restaurants are mediocre and over-priced, and at Christmas/New Year/Valentine's become mediocre and vastly over-priced, presumably. The best restaurants seem to remain stubbornly closed on Christmas Day!

So then, we come to the question of restaurant Christmas dinners served in the pre- Christmas period. If turkey is kept for a special occasion like Christmas, then why choose to eat it (or a version of it) a fortnight before the big occasion too? I'm genuinely puzzled.
Last year we ate out at a local hotel - an old coaching inn.
OK it was £70 but the grub was lovely
And we ate at 1:30. Opp Norf, dinnertime is at midday. Evening meals are tea or supper
I had the venison - not a fan of turkey. No Yorkshire puddings tho :(
(we were 7. Think there were 4 different choices as to the mains.)
 
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