National rail map

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tsr

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This one any better?

(I should point out that although this map places every station correctly, the TOCs' services it shows are riddled with errors and inconsistencies that have gone uncorrected for years.)
Barely. It does not provide as great a level of geographic realism, and they've got some of the names on the Liskeard-Looe line wrong, as well as the name of Teesside Airport (there should be no hyphen).

;) <D
 

reb0118

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You can get paper copies of previous issues on ebay. I've never seen one past 2006 though - probably when paper copies stopped being published?

Usually available for less than a couple of quid + p&p.

Just add/subtract any changes yourself.
 

telstarbox

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reb0118

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The final Network Rail printed National Rail Timetable was the May-December 2007 edition, which included the 2007 map.
What bridge is shewn on the cover of that map? 2005 has the Forth Bridge and 2006 looks like a representation of the Ribblehead Viaduct? (I think one of the "Three Peaks" is also shewn??)
 

Tiny Tim

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I've noticed before that a geographically accurate, high quality map of the entire British railway system doesn't seem to be available. I like to see the whole network, including abandoned, out of use and freight only lines, and the only map I can find online is http://www.systemed.net/atlas/ and this isn't finished yet. I've looked in railway bookshops for 'complete' maps but they don't seem to be around. 'Frozen in time' maps from various points in history exist, but that's about it. Unless you know different.
 

caliwag

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Not strictly a system atlas, but I have always liked the Readers Digest, Book of the Road. Despite its title, it has very good graphics including strong black railway lines...all at 4miles to the inch. Get the original 1966 edition for obvious reasons.
You can copies for less than £1 + £2-£3 postage on www.abebooks.co.uk
Get several and cut them up to paper your study wall with your favorite area(s) Having said that, if you can find them, you can get OS based 4" maps of the period, but not sure if ABE sells maps.
 

jp347

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http://www.railroute.co.uk/map
This is very good, but slightly out of date (still shows NXEA & WSMR)
Also there appears to be an inexplicable East Coast service between Machynlleth and Pwllheli.....
But you can buy full-size printouts of it.
Adam :D
The East Coast service looks like it is meant to be the steam service summer service from Mach to Port/Pwh as it has the correct route and calling pattern for that, so it is in the wrong colour or that colour is slightly different to the ones in the key.
 

the sniper

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I'll check on Monday, but I'm sure my local London Midland station has a large national rail map poster in the ticket office (staff side) produced by (I believe) TRACKmaps. It doesn't have track level detail, but it does look good and clear. I'll check who made it, but it's better than the National Rail one.
 

D6700

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What bridge is shewn on the cover of that map? 2005 has the Forth Bridge and 2006 looks like a representation of the Ribblehead Viaduct? (I think one of the "Three Peaks" is also shewn??)
The 2007 map shows the Royal Albert Bridge over the River Tamar between Plymouth and Saltash. The road carrying suspension "Tamar Bridge" is also shown in the background.

The angle of view is almost identical to this photo:
http://www.railholiday.co.uk/royalalbertbridge3.jpg
 

LE Greys

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The final Network Rail printed National Rail Timetable was the May-December 2007 edition, which included the 2007 map.
One of those is on my wall (very useful for guess the station games). I also have a 1989 one somewhere, when the lines were orange and there was no Channel Tunnel, but a hovercraft route was marked. If I ever find it, it would be interesting to compare the two.
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
The 2007 map shows the Royal Albert Bridge over the River Tamar between Plymouth and Saltash. The road carrying suspension "Tamar Bridge" is also shown in the background.

The angle of view is almost identical to this photo:
http://www.railholiday.co.uk/royalalbertbridge3.jpg
So it is, I'm looking at it now.
 

Sammy h

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Thanks for your comments and help everyone. I appreciate it. I am still non the wiser, but I will get my hands on one which fits my needs best. Cheers :)
 

MidnightFlyer

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I'll check on Monday, but I'm sure my local London Midland station has a large national rail map poster in the ticket office (staff side) produced by (I believe) TRACKmaps. It doesn't have track level detail, but it does look good and clear. I'll check who made it, but it's better than the National Rail one.
Some EC stations have Rail Route ones, however I know Quail did produce a decent-sized rail map of Britain a few years ago. It came free with Today's Railways UK a while ago, it contains all stations (with more detailed blow ups of complex areas) and preserved railways too.
 
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