Pigeon Causes 6min Delay

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sonic2009

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You've probably read this and thought what this all about. :)

Today while awaiting 2000 Bristol - Birmingham 220018 to couple up to 220030 I noticed a dead piegon in the coupling of 220030, I made a joke with the driver that's piegon mash in a moment. he laughed, so 22030 tries to couple to 220018 no joy. Tries again still no joy. So the driver gets out and tries to couple 220018 to 220030 no luck. Hang on a minute this pigeon is being disruptive. :) driver gets out on 220018, gets his Hand a takes the piegon out of 220030 and has another go. FINALLY were good to go :) everybody thought this was funny.

Anybody got any interesting stories about animals causing disruption. :)
 
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Schnellzug

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urgh, I wouldn't mind betting there's something in Health & Safety about removing mashed pigeons, particularly with one's bare hands. I admire his dedication to minimising delay, but I think I'd ask for a pair of gloves. :-/
 

merlodlliw

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You've probably read this and thought what this all about. :)

Today while awaiting 2000 Bristol - Birmingham 220018 to couple up to 220030 I noticed a dead piegon in the coupling of 220030, I made a joke with the driver that's piegon mash in a moment. he laughed, so 22030 tries to couple to 220018 no joy. Tries again still no joy. So the driver gets out and tries to couple 220018 to 220030 no luck. Hang on a minute this pigeon is being disruptive. :) driver gets out on 220018, gets his Hand a takes the piegon out of 220030 and has another go. FINALLY were good to go :) everybody thought this was funny.

Anybody got any interesting stories about animals causing disruption. :)
All I can say is, what is a PIEGON, with all respect
 

sprinterguy

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All I can say is, what is a PIEGON.
It's a further sub-species of the humble pigeon: In the same way as the pigeons that frequent our city centres are descendants of the rock dove, so is the piegon descended from the pigeon, having cornered itself a niche corner of the market by foraging only for cheap, take away pastry products from the many high street outlets dealing in such commodities. Hence the name, pie-gon.
 

142094

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It's a further sub-species of the humble pigeon: In the same way as the pigeons that frequent our city centres are descendants of the rock dove, so is the piegon descended from the pigeon, having cornered itself a niche corner of the market by foraging only for cheap, take away pastry products from the many high street outlets dealing in such commodities. Hence the name, pie-gon.
:D

I once saw a pigeon run over by a bus, but was still obviously alive. Cue Mr. Seagull to swoop down and start eating some of it...
 

sprinterguy

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:D

I once saw a pigeon run over by a bus, but was still obviously alive. Cue Mr. Seagull to swoop down and start eating some of it...
The urban reality of the circle of life. You don't see Elton John singing about that now, do you... :D

There's the well known phenomena of exploding pigeons causing delays at stations with OHLE, but I think that's a bit grisly, rather than amusing.
 

142094

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The urban reality of the circle of life. You don't see Elton John singing about that now, do you... :D

There's the well known phenomena of exploding pigeons causing delays at stations with OHLE, but I think that's a bit grisly, rather than amusing.
Carlisle used to have that netting to keep the pigeons out, which wasn't successful at all. Quite a few dead ones used to get trapped, and I'm sure when I looked close enough you could see the maggots and other things.
 

DaveNewcastle

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Anybody got any interesting stories about animals causing disruption.
I would expect that most people on here have travelled on enough rural services to have encountered animals on the track quite a few times.
Its regrettable that many collisions are unavoidable, particularly on unfenced lines, but in so many areas sheep and other creatures seem so proficient at finding the smallest gap in fencing and then, having got onto the line, wander further. Then they become trapped lineside by the very fencing that had been constructed to keep them out!
Collisions are almost inevtibale in cuttings.

On my own regular routes, animal incursion is frequent, and the inevitable and regular collision is regrettable. Fortunately, the post-Polmont considerations and recomendations seem to have eliminated the greatest hazards to high-speed rail travel from large animals. Birds, much as I love them, are not a high-risk hazard, so all I have by way of 'a story' relates to a road vehicle. I'd agreed to take in a vehicle from Edinburgh but the delivery driver apologised for havng struck a huge crow on the A1 and hadn't been able to extract it from the radiator grille where it was impalled.

I chastised him for not using the proper tools - in this case, a crow-bar.
 

sprinterguy

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Carlisle used to have that netting to keep the pigeons out, which wasn't successful at all. Quite a few dead ones used to get trapped, and I'm sure when I looked close enough you could see the maggots and other things.
Yeah, I remember that netting: The raucous evening chorus of chirping coming from within the roof proved on a daily basis that it didn't work. :lol: And as you say, the most it ever did was stop dead pigeons and starlings from dropping to the floor, instead keeping them suspended twenty feet or so above passengers' heads!
 

trentside

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Serious question, why aren't the 3rd rail tracksides littered with the dead corpses of foxes, badgers, cats etc.?

Or maybe they are!
In some places I believe badger runs are in place under the track, to avoid the animals frying themselves on the 3rd rail.
 

12CSVT

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In some places I believe badger runs are in place under the track, to avoid the animals frying themselves on the 3rd rail.
I seem to remember British Rail were required to do that when they elelctrified Tonbridge to Hastings
 

Tugzrule

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Carlisle used to have that netting to keep the pigeons out, which wasn't successful at all. Quite a few dead ones used to get trapped, and I'm sure when I looked close enough you could see the maggots and other things.

How does the maggots dropping onto enthusiasts below sound? I know someone who that happened to and let's just say they weren't best amused. Still get the bird c*** from the roosting starlings at the P2 end causing some bother, the pigeons taken care of by other means...
 

Lrd

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I have seen, what looked to be, a bird being dragged by one of the shoes on a 444, just came from the Bournemouth area for a little trip up to London.

Also, I have seen plenty of birds taking a rest on the third rail.
 

tsr

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Serious question, why aren't the 3rd rail tracksides littered with the dead corpses of foxes, badgers, cats etc.?

Or maybe they are!
Some animals might be able to sense electric current much in the same way that humans can hear a buzz from some electrical equipment, but I'm not sure what scientific proof there might be of this... Also, the electrical resistance of a small animal such as a cat would be significantly lower than that of a human, and the current might not be as severely affected as to cause a shock.
 

33056

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Some animals might be able to sense electric current much in the same way that humans can hear a buzz from some electrical equipment, but I'm not sure what scientific proof there might be of this... Also, the electrical resistance of a small animal such as a cat would be significantly lower than that of a human, and the current might not be as severely affected as to cause a shock.
I am sure there is at least some truth in this. A signal box I used to work on a 3rd rail route had a cat and it studiously avoided the "juice" to the extent that it always walked round the back, away from the tracks and took a route along the bank using an underbridge to get to the other side of the railway.

Regarding pigeons, once had two that caused a flashover on the overheads knocking out a track circuit in the process. Following an examination of the line and being advised of the cause, the box supervisor duly recorded the incident in his log as being caused by "two pigeons coupled" :lol:
 

Dr.iver

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Whilst doing my train handling a few years back a Jay flew through our open cab window and struck my driver trainer on the forehead, he was cut on the side of his head and bled quite a bit whilst the poor Jay lay dead on the cab floor. It took a long time to convince the signaller what had happened due to mine and his laughter
 

pendolino

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Serious question, why aren't the 3rd rail tracksides littered with the dead corpses of foxes, badgers, cats etc.?

Or maybe they are!
They are. Don't see too many cats, but plenty of badgers and foxes, often in the gap between 3rd rail and adjacent running rail. The badgers' bodies seem to inflate as they decompose leading to their legs sticking out at weird angles.

Sorry if you're eating your tea.
 

ralphchadkirk

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They are. Don't see too many cats, but plenty of badgers and foxes, often in the gap between 3rd rail and adjacent running rail. The badgers' bodies seem to inflate as they decompose leading to their legs sticking out at weird angles.

Sorry if you're eating your tea.
All bodies inflate as they decompose - it's the gases produced as a result of the decomposing.
 
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